Agriculture and Food Security

Launched in 2008, the Agriculture programme is the largest sector of the Liberian economy, making up over half of all economic activity (2005), and is the most important source of income for women. BRAC’s agriculture program covers 20 branches across six counties:-Margibi, Bong, Nimba, Lofa, Montserrado, and Grand Bassa. BRAC’s agriculture programme addresses the problem of poor crop productivity in Liberia. Our aim is to improve the efficiency and management of small to medium farm enterprises. The programme is designed to increase agricultural output, raise farm income and increase rural employment.

We engage and empower female agriculture workers by increasing crop production and profitability of agriculture ventures. The agriculture programme operates through community agriculture promoters (CAPs) with farming experience, who are selected directly from our microfinance groups and non-group members. These promoters receive intensive training, microfinance loans, and supplies to inform and assist other farmers, enabling them to substantially improve crop harvests and livestock yields. The promoters benefit from increased yields on their own farms as well as from additional income from selling services and inputs, such as high quality seeds, to their farming neighbours.

In 2010, BRAC began its seed testing and multiplication farm in Kingsville, producing high quality rice and maize seeds to help improve agriculture yields in Liberia. BRAC in cooperation with Central Agricultural Research Institute (CARI) is testing vitamin A- enriched cassava. It will be disseminated to the local community after multiplication.

BRAC started poultry and livestock programme in Liberia in 2008 addressing the problem of poor livestock productivity in Liberia. Our aim is to improve the efficiency and management of small to medium farm enterprises. The programme is designed to decrease livestock mortality, raise farm income, and increase rural employment.
BRAC initially started poultry and livestock programmes in five branch offices across three counties- Margibi, Bong and Nimba and currently implementing livestock programme in 20 branches across six counties- Margibi, Bong, Nimba, Lofa, Montserrado and Grand Bassa.

The livestock and poultry programme carries out community activities through self-employed community livestock and poultry promoters (CLPPs). These female promoters receive intensive training, microfinance loans and supplies to inform and assist other farmers. The promoters benefit from increased yields on their own farms as well as new income from selling services and inputs like poultry vaccine, medicine and also share knowledge among other interested farmers.

Related articles:
Walter Campbell: From typical farmer to progressive model farmer